“The Last Return of the Fuzzballs,” now playing at the Guyer Art Barn, marks the fifth and final entry in the New Classics Company’s annual “Star Wars” tribute shows.

HYANNIS – The epic saga is complete.

“The Last Return of the Fuzzballs,” now playing at the Guyer Art Barn, marks the fifth and final entry in the New Classics Company’s annual “Star Wars” tribute shows featuring Brett Burkhardt, Matt Kohler and Justin Jay Gray – better known as the Fuzzballs – as diehard fans who re-create the movies on stage using sock puppets, cheap costumes and spray-painted cardboard cutouts.

“The Last Return” picks up where last year’s episode left off. The Fuzzballs are battling the Cams (Cardboard Automated Minions), a rival stage troupe led by a sinister figure named Greg (Greg Parker), who’s determined to create his own “Star Wars” tribute show. Somehow the Fuzzballs persevere and perform a hilarious version of “Return of the Jedi” that features an old sock puppet as Chewbacca and a hunk of cardboard as R2-D2.

Burkhardt’s Luke Skywalker impression is so dead-on that, at first, I thought he was only mouthing Luke’s dialogue as they played Mark Hamill’s voice over the loudspeaker. He’s a brilliant mimic.

As Han Solo, Gray had the play’s best and most belabored entrance. Having been frozen in carbonite since the last episode, Gray doesn’t appear until Kohler, dressed as Princess Leia, breaks into Jabba’s palace and hits the “unfreeze” button on the outside of his prison chamber. It was hilarious to watch as Gray stumbled through the curtain and collapsed onto the stage from “exhaustion.”

As with the other “Star Wars” tribute shows, “The Last Return” makes the most of its audience. We each received a goody bag with a glow stick, a teddy bear and a cardboard tie-fighter to throw at the cast members on command. One lucky lady was even invited on stage to play Princess Leia.

I can’t decide if Kohler was funnier as Darth Vader or when he dressed up as Oola, Jabba the Hutt’s doomed dancer. The sight of him wearing lime green tights and Oola’s iconic headdress had the audience in stitches.

For all its relentless silliness, “The Last Return of the Fuzzballs” ends on a somewhat serious note. Greg is revealed to be a representative for Disney, which purchased the franchise last year. His plan is to ruin all competing “Star Wars” tribute shows so he can go on making his tributes forever. For Greg and Disney, the series is an endless cash cow.

The Fuzzballs recognize that the show can’t go on forever. The “Star Wars” spinoffs may come out faster than audiences can process them, but the troupe has too much integrity to cash in.

Disney would be wise to follow the Fuzzballs’ example and stop churning out spinoffs that are draining the life force out of the series.